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Common Rodent Entry Points

This guide will provide you with some of the most common entry points rodents use to get inside a structure, as well as how to eliminate those entry points.

 

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Under Sinks

Look under every sink in your home (kitchen, bathroom, laundry room, workroom, etc.). Zero in on where the pipes come through the wall, and check to see if there are gaps around any of the pipes.

Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Along Baseboards

Walk the perimeter of every room in your house (including the bathrooms and basement). Look for any gaps or cracks between the floor and wall or baseboard and wall.

Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Around Windows

Look at each window (if applicable, from both the inside and the outside) and search for any gaps or cracks around the window.

Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Under and Around Doors

Look at every door that opens to the outside or into a garage. For apartments, look at any doors located on an external wall (e.g. the door the opens into the hallway).

When the door is closed, look for gaps along the bottom of the If you can slide a pencil anywhere under the door, that’s an area pests can get in. Any door with a gap larger than ¼ an inch should be fitted with an Xcluder® Door Sweep. Pro Tip: At night, turn on the lights in the house and step outside. Can you see light coming out from under the door? If so, there is a gap big enough for a rodent to slip through. Door Sweep “How To” Installation Video

Search for any openings between the door and the frame. Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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In the attic

Go up during the daytime and turn off all the lights. Anywhere you see light coming in (walls or roof) is a potential entry point for rodents.

Small gaps or cracks can be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric. You may need to call a professional roofer for larger entry points.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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In the basement or crawlspace

Cracks in the foundation and/or around windows in a basement or crawlspace are comment rodent entry points that often need to be addressed. It’s also important to look at all utility lines, pipes, wires and/or vents that come through the wall or ceiling, as these are also common rodent entry points.

Any gaps larger than ¼ an inch (or roughly the size of a pencil) around these features should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric

Extremely large or long gaps or cracks may need to be addressed by a professional

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Foundation

Walk around the perimeter of your home looking for any gaps, cracks or openings in the foundation or walls. Does your structure have weep holes (small openings in masonry walls that allow water to drain and air to circulate)?  Xcluder® Fill Fabric’s mesh design allows both air and water to easily run through, while still blocking rodents or other pests from getting inside.

Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Large or long gaps or cracks should be addressed by a professional

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Utility Lines

Look at all utility lines, pipes and wires that enter the house from the outside. Zero in on where the utility line enters the wall, and check for gaps around any of the line, as these are all very common rodent entry points.

Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Roof

Do a visual inspection of your roofline to identify any gaps or holes larger than ¼ an inch (pay special attention to the space between the house and the roof eves). If you are using a ladder, always use caution!

Small gaps or cracks ¼ inch or larger (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric

Large or long gaps or cracks should be addressed by a professional

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

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Garage

Close the garage and look along the area where the garage door meets the floor and look for gaps. Specifically check to see if any light in under the door or there are any areas where you can slide a pencil in under the closed door.

If there are gaps larger than ¼ an inch (or you can see light come in under the door) install an Xcluder® Garage Door Seal. Then look at the sides of the garage door, zeroing in on the vertical weather stripping along the sides.

If there are any gaps or holes, or if the weather stripping appears thin or is at all damaged or torn, fit the base of the weather strips with Xcluder® Garage Door Rodent Shields.

Lastly, walk the perimeter of the inside AND the outside of the garage.

Floors & Walls: Look for any gaps or cracks between the floor and wall or in the wall itself. Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Windows: If the garage or shed has windows, look at each window from the inside and the outside to identify any gaps or cracks around the window. Anything ¼ inch (or roughly the diameter of a pencil) or larger should be filled with Xcluder® Fill Fabric.

Doors: Inspect any side or back doors that open into the garage and/or to outside. When the door is closed, look for gaps along the bottom of the door. Specifically check to see if any light or air comes in from under the door or if there is a gap larger than ¼ an inch. If so, fit the bottom of the door with an Xcluder® Door Sweep.

Fill Fabric “How To” Installation Video

Door Sweep “How To” Installation Video

Rodent Facts

Mice can fit through a hole or gap ¼ of an inch in diameter, or roughly the size of a pencil.

Rats can fit through a hole or gap ¾ of an inch, or roughly the size of a penny.

Both mice and rats can climb any slightly rough vertical surface, including wood, plaster, brick, metal pipes, wire mesh, cables, etc.

Mice and rats have very good balance and can easily run along horizontal electrical wires, ropes, cables, vines, or branches, jumping from one part of a building to another.